OF THE CAROLINAS & GEORGIA

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Most habitat and range descriptions were obtained from Weakley's Flora.

Your search found 2 taxa in the family Acoraceae, Calamus family, as understood by PLANTS National Database.

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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: European Sweetflag, European Calamus

Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Acorus calamus   FAMILY: Acoraceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Acorus calamus   FAMILY: Acoraceae

INCLUDED WITHIN Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Acorus calamus 032-01-001   FAMILY: Araceae

 

Look for it in marshes, wet meadows, other wet areas

Uncommon

Non-native: Eurasia

 


drawing of Acorus americanus, Sweetflag, American Calamus need picture of Acorus americanus, Sweetflag, American Calamus need picture Acorus americanus, Sweetflag, American Calamus need picture of Acorus americanus, Sweetflag, American Calamus need picture of Acorus americanus, Sweetflag, American Calamus
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speaker icon Common Name: Sweetflag, American Calamus

Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Acorus americanus   FAMILY: Acoraceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Acorus americanus   FAMILY: Acoraceae

INCLUDED WITHIN Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Acorus calamus 032-01-001?   FAMILY: Araceae

 

Look for it in marshes, wet meadows, other wet areas, limey seeps

Rare (distribution poorly known; additional distribution records expected)

Native

 


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"The term 'taxa' (singular, 'taxon') designates described plant entities and may be used as an alternative to 'species' when there is sufficient disagreement among taxonomists as to whether the plant is a true species or not. If not widely accepted as a distinct species, the plant may be considered a 'variety' or 'forma,' but all such units of identity are still taxa." — Ron Lance, Woody Plants of the Southeastern US, A Winter Guide