OF THE CAROLINAS & GEORGIA

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Most habitat and range descriptions were obtained from Weakley's Flora.

Your search found 3 taxa in the family Balsaminaceae, Touch-me-not family, as understood by PLANTS National Database.

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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Pale Jewelweed, Pale Touch-me-not, Yellow Jewelweed, Yellow Touch-me-not

Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Impatiens pallida   FAMILY: Balsaminaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Impatiens pallida   FAMILY: Balsaminaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Impatiens pallida 118-01-001   FAMILY: Balsaminaceae

 

Habitat: Cove forests, streambanks, seepages, moist forests, bogs, roadsides

Native to North Carolina & Georgia

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Spotted Jewelweed, Spotted Touch-me-not, Orange Jewelweed, Orange Touch-me-not

Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Impatiens capensis   FAMILY: Balsaminaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Impatiens capensis   FAMILY: Balsaminaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Impatiens capensis 118-01-002   FAMILY: Balsaminaceae

 

Habitat: Moist forests, bottomlands, cove forests, streambanks, bogs

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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Common Name: Ornamental Jewelweed, Himalayan Balsam, Indian Balsam

Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) -   FAMILY: Balsaminaceae

PLANTS National Database: Impatiens glandulifera   FAMILY: Balsaminaceae

 

Non-native

 


Your search found 3 taxa. You are on page PAGE 1 out of 1 pages.


"If the leaves... stand opposite, the tree (if it is of large size) belongs to the maple, ash, or horse-chestnut family.... If the leaves are simple the tree is a maple; if pinnately compound of several leaflets, it is an ash; if palmately compound, of five to seven leaflets, it is a horse-chestnut." — Julia E. Rogers, Trees Worth Knowing