OF THE CAROLINAS & GEORGIA

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Most habitat and range descriptions were obtained from Weakley's Flora.

Your search found 3 taxa in the family Buxaceae, Boxwood family, as understood by PLANTS National Database.

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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Allegheny Spurge, Mountain Pachysandra

Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Pachysandra procumbens   FAMILY: Buxaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Pachysandra procumbens   FAMILY: Buxaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Pachysandra procumbens 108-01-001   FAMILY: Buxaceae

 

Habitat: Moist rich forests, mainly over calcareous or mafic rocks

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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camera icon Common Name: Pachysandra, Japanese Spurge

Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Pachysandra terminalis   FAMILY: Buxaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Pachysandra terminalis   FAMILY: Buxaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Pachysandra terminalis 108-01-002   FAMILY: Buxaceae

 

Habitat: Persistent after cultivation, and spreading vegetatively to adjacent forests; commonly cultivated, rarely persistent to naturalized

Non-native: China/Japan

 


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Common Name: Boxwood, Common Box

Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Buxus sempervirens   FAMILY: Buxaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Buxus sempervirens   FAMILY: Buxaceae

 

Habitat: Persistent for decades at abandoned homesites, and spreading weakly from dumped hedge trimmings and other cuttings

Non-native: Europe

 


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"Look at the twigs of half a dozen kinds of trees, and find the little raised dots on the smooth surface. They usually vary in color from the bark. These are lenticels, or breathing pores ... porous, corky tissue that filters the air as it comes in." — Julia E. Rogers, Trees Worth Knowing