Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia

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Your search found 2 taxa.

Most habitat and range descriptions were obtained from Weakley's Flora.

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camera icon Common Name: Fanwort, Carolina Fanwort
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Cabomba caroliniana
INCLUDING PLANTS National Database: Cabomba caroliniana +
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Cabomba caroliniana 075-01-001

 

Look for it in millponds, lakes, slow-moving streams

Uncommon (rare in Piedmont)

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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camera icon Common Name: Water-shield, Purple Wen-dock
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Brasenia schreberi
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Brasenia schreberi
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Brasenia schreberi 075-02-001

 

Look for it in lakes, ponds, sluggish streams, floodplain oxbow ponds

Common in Coastal Plain (rare in Piedmont & Mountains)

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


Your search found 2 taxa. You are on page PAGE 1 out of 1 pages.


"Molecular biology, specifically the advent of DNA testing and analysis, has brought about a virtual revolution in the biological sciences, especially in the realm of classification and systematics, or taxonomy. Many plants and other organisms thought to be unrelated under the old systems are now revealed to share genetics closely in common — and some long classified as near relatives have been discovered to bear physical resemblances only." — John Eastman, Book of Field and Roadside.