Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia

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Most habitat and range descriptions were obtained from Weakley's Flora.

Your search found 3 taxa in the family Dipsacaceae, Teasel family, as understood by PLANTS National Database.

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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Wild Teasel, Common Teasel
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Dipsacus fullonum   FAMILY: Dipsacaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Dipsacus fullonum   FAMILY: Dipsacaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Dipsacus sylvestris 176-01-001   FAMILY: Dipsacaceae

 

Look for it on roadsides, in pastures, disturbed areas

Common (rare in GA & NC)

Non-native: Europe

 


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camera icon Common Name: Cutleaf Teasel
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Dipsacus laciniatus   FAMILY: Dipsacaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Dipsacus laciniatus   FAMILY: Dipsacaceae

 

Look for it in disturbed areas

Non-native: Europe

 


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Common Name: Fuller's Teasel
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Dipsacus sativus   FAMILY: Dipsacaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Dipsacus sativus   FAMILY: Dipsacaceae

 

Non-native: Europe

 


Your search found 3 taxa. You are on page PAGE 1 out of 1 pages.


"I can't remember when a landscape style so captured the American gardener as the meadow has today. Perhaps we are tired of designer gardens and highly bred flowers that are ever brighter, shorter, showier, and more uniform. Perhaps as open fields shrink or are rimmed by NO TRESPASSING signs, we feel compelled to create little pieces of country for ourselves. Perhaps it is because of concern for the environment and our natural resources." — Jim Wilson, Landscaping with Wildflowers