OF THE CAROLINAS & GEORGIA

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Most habitat and range descriptions were obtained from Weakley's Flora.

Your search found 3 taxa in the family Linderniaceae, False-pimpernel family, as understood by Weakley's Flora.

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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Yellowseed False Pimpernel

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Lindernia dubia var. dubia   FAMILY: Linderniaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Lindernia dubia var. dubia   FAMILY: Scrophulariaceae

INCLUDED WITHIN Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Lindernia dubia 166-09-002   FAMILY: Scrophulariaceae

 

Habitat: Wet sandy or muddy areas

Common

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Flatrock Pimpernel, Riverbank Pimpernel, False Pimpernel, Piedmont Pimpernel

Weakley's Flora: (4/24/22) Lindernia monticola   FAMILY: Linderniaceae

INCLUDED WITHIN PLANTS National Database: Lindernia monticola   FAMILY: Scrophulariaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Lindernia monticola 166-09-004   FAMILY: Scrophulariaceae

 

Habitat: In seasonal seepage on granitic flatrocks, mesic hammocks, pine savannas

Common in GA Piedmont (uncommon or rare elsewhere)

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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Common Name: Shade Mudflower

Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Micranthemum umbrosum   FAMILY: Linderniaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Micranthemum umbrosum   FAMILY: Scrophulariaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Micranthemum umbrosum 166-10-001   FAMILY: Scrophulariaceae

 

Habitat: Shallow pools, stagnant streams, wet depressions in swamp forests

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


Your search found 3 taxa. You are on page PAGE 1 out of 1 pages.


"Invasive exotics share several strong traits: fit well within the environment, grow rapidly, mature to produce flowers and seed at an early age, produce great quantities of seed, effectively disperse their seed (via birds, etc.), rampantly spread vegetatively, have no major pest of disease problems. Horticulturally, some of these characteristics are considered quite desirable. Thus there is the absurd irony of various governmental and environmental groups trying hard to control and eradicate in the wild some of the very same species being sold to gardeners all over the US...." — Margie Hunter, Gardening with the Native Plants of Tennessee