Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia

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Most habitat and range descriptions were obtained from Weakley's Flora.

Your search found 3 taxa in the family Lygodiaceae, Climbing Fern family, as understood by PLANTS National Database.

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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: American Climbing Fern
Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Lygodium palmatum   FAMILY: Lygodiaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Lygodium palmatum   FAMILY: Lygodiaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Lygodium palmatum 008-01-001   FAMILY: Schizaeaceae

 

Look for it in bogs, moist thickets, swamp forests, sandstone outcrops, roadside ditches and roadbanks, in strongly acid soils

Rare

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Japanese Climbing Fern
Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Lygodium japonicum   FAMILY: Lygodiaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Lygodium japonicum   FAMILY: Lygodiaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Lygodium japonicum 008-01-002   FAMILY: Schizaeaceae

 

Look for it in disturbed areas, the leaves (up to 30 m in length!) climbing into the canopy of trees in swamp forests and other wet habitats

Rare outside of Coastal Plain & north of SC

Non-native: east Asia

 


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camera icon Common Name: Old World Climbing Fern, Small-leaf Climbing Fern
Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Lygodium microphyllum   FAMILY: Lygodiaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Lygodium microphyllum   FAMILY: Lygodiaceae

 

Look for it in swamps, hammocks, disturbed areas

Non-native: southeast Asia

 


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"Most plants grow from their tips to add length. By contrast, grass grows from its base, emerging from a bud at, or just under, the soil surface, where sensitve growth tissues remain safe from the elements and hungry herds." — Douglas Chadwick, The American Prairie, Root of the Sky, National Geographic, October 1993