OF THE CAROLINAS & GEORGIA

Hovering over an image will enlarge it (works better on desktop than on mobile).

camera icon A camera indicates there are pictures.
speaker icon A speaker indicates that a botanical name is pronounced.
plus sign icon A plus sign after a Latin name indicates that the species is further divided into varieties or subspecies.

Most habitat and range descriptions were obtained from Weakley's Flora.

Your search found 3 taxa in the family Lygodiaceae, Climbing Fern family, as understood by Weakley's Flora.

arrow

range map

camera icon speaker icon Common Name: American Climbing Fern

Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Lygodium palmatum   FAMILY: Lygodiaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Lygodium palmatum   FAMILY: Lygodiaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Lygodium palmatum 008-01-001   FAMILY: Schizaeaceae

 

Habitat: Bogs, moist thickets, swamp forests, sandstone outcrops, roadside ditches and roadbanks, in strongly acid soils

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


range map

camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Japanese Climbing Fern

Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Lygodium japonicum   FAMILY: Lygodiaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Lygodium japonicum   FAMILY: Lygodiaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Lygodium japonicum 008-01-002   FAMILY: Schizaeaceae

 

Habitat: Disturbed areas

Non-native: east Asia

 


range map

camera icon Common Name: Old World Climbing Fern, Small-leaf Climbing Fern

Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Lygodium microphyllum   FAMILY: Lygodiaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Lygodium microphyllum   FAMILY: Lygodiaceae

 

Habitat: Swamps, hammocks, disturbed areas

Non-native: southeast Asia

 


Your search found 3 taxa. You are on page PAGE 1 out of 1 pages.


"In most trees the smooth epidermis of twigs is shed as the bark thickens.... Cherry and birch trees retain the silky epidermal bark on limbs, and in patches, at least, on the trunks of old trees. Here the lenticels are seen as parallel, horizontal slits." — Julia E. Rogers, Trees Worth Knowing