Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia

Clicking on particular species will lead you to more information or photographs:

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A plus sign after a Latin name indicates that the species is further divided into varieties or subspecies. plus sign icon

Your search found 4 taxa.

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range map need picture of flower of Marsilea macropoda, Golden Waterclover, Big-footed Waterclover
Common Name: Golden Waterclover, Big-footed Waterclover
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Marsilea macropoda
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Marsilea macropoda

range map need picture of flower of Marsilea minuta, Dwarf Waterclover, Small Waterclover
camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Dwarf Waterclover, Small Waterclover
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Marsilea minuta
(?) PLANTS National Database: Marsilea minuta

SYNONYMOUS WITH Flora of North America Marsilea minuta


range map need picture of flower of Marsilea mutica, Australian Waterclover, Nardoo
Common Name: Australian Waterclover, Nardoo
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Marsilea mutica
(?) PLANTS National Database: Marsilea mutica

SYNONYMOUS WITH Guide to the Vascular Plants of Florida (Wunderlin & Hansen, 2011) Marsilea mutica


range map need picture of flower of Marsilea quadrifolia, European Waterclover, European Pepperwort, European Water Shamrock
Common Name: European Waterclover, European Pepperwort, European Water Shamrock
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Marsilea quadrifolia
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Marsilea quadrifolia

Your search found 4 taxa. You are on page PAGE 1 out of 1 pages.


"Common names should be written in lower case unless part of the name is proper and then the first letter of only the proper term is capitalized. For example, sugar maple would be written with lower case letters while Japanese maple would be written with the capital J. This is the accepted method for writing common names in scientific circles and should be familiar to the student. In this text, and many others, common names are written with capital first letters. This was done to set the name off from the rest of the sentence and make it more evident to the reader. Actually in modern horticultural writings the capitalized common name predominates." — Michael Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants