Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia

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Your search found 3 taxa.

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camera icon Common Name: Carolina Leaf-flower
Weakley's Flora: (2/8/20) Phyllanthus caroliniensis
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Phyllanthus caroliniensis ssp. caroliniensis

SYNONYMOUS WITH Manual of Vascular Plants of NE US & Adjacent Canada (Gleason & Cronquist,1991) Phyllanthus caroliniensis var. caroliniensis

INCLUDED WITHIN (ORTHOGRAPHIC ERROR) Aquatic & Wetland Plants of Southeastern US (Godfrey & Wooten, 1979 & 1981) Phyllanthus carolinensis

INCLUDED WITHIN Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Phyllanthus caroliniensis 107-10-001

SYNONYMOUS WITH Manual of the Southeastern Flora (Small, 1933) Phyllanthus caroliniensis


Flowers produced on ultimate and penultimate orders of branches, per Weakley's Flora.


camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Mascarene Island Leaf-flower
Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Phyllanthus tenellus
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Phyllanthus tenellus
SYNONYMOUS WITH (MISAPPLIED) (MISIDENTIFIED) Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Phyllanthus amarus 107-10-002

Long, capillary pistillate pedicels that are flexuous and pendent in fruit, per Flora of North America.


camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Chamber Bitter
Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Phyllanthus urinaria ssp. urinaria
INCLUDED WITHIN PLANTS National Database: Phyllanthus urinaria

Male flowers borne toward branchlet tip, female [and thus fruit] toward base, per Weakley's Flora (2012).


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"There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of nature — the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after winter." — Rachel Carson