Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia

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Your search found 3 taxa.

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camera icon Common Name: Carolina Leaf-flower
Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Phyllanthus caroliniensis ssp. caroliniensis
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Phyllanthus caroliniensis ssp. caroliniensis
LESS THAN Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (1968): Phyllanthus caroliniensis 107-10-001

LESS THAN (ORTHOGRAPHIC ERROR) Aquatic & Wetland Plants of Southeastern US (Godfrey & Wooten, 1979 & 1981) Phyllanthus carolinensis

SYNONYMOUS WITH Manual of the Southeastern Flora (Small, 1933) Phyllanthus caroliniensis


Flowers produced on ultimate and penultimate orders of branches, per Weakley's Flora.


camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Mascarene Island Leaf-flower
Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Phyllanthus tenellus
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Phyllanthus tenellus
SYNONYMOUS WITH (MISAPPLIED) (MISIDENTIFIED) Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (1968): Phyllanthus amarus 107-10-002

Long, capillary pistillate pedicels that are flexuous and pendent in fruit, per Flora of North America.


camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Chamber Bitter
Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Phyllanthus urinaria ssp. urinaria
LESS THAN PLANTS National Database: Phyllanthus urinaria

Male flowers borne toward branchlet tip, female flowers toward the base, per Weakley's Flora.


Your search found 3 taxa. You are on page PAGE 1 out of 1 pages.


"Within the same group [of Oaks] ... leaves alone must not be used for final identification, as, even on the same tree, the leaves may vary more among themselves than between those of other species. This does not mean that there is no typical shape or shapes for any given species, but only that not every leaf will take a typical form." — George W.D. Symonds, The Tree Identification Book