Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia

Clicking on particular species will lead you to more information or photographs:

A camera indicates there are pictures. camera icon
A speaker indicates there is a sound file demonstrating pronunciation of the botanical name. speaker icon
A plus sign after a Latin name indicates that the species is further divided into varieties or subspecies. plus sign icon

Your search found 4 taxa.

arrow icon arrow

camera icon Common Name: Balloon Vine, Love-in-a-puff, Heartseed
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Cardiospermum halicacabum
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Cardiospermum halicacabum
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (1968): Cardiospermum halicacabum 117-01-001


Flowers 0.2" wide, borne in small clusters on long stalks from leaf axils, per Wildflowers of Tennessee.


camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Golden Rain-tree
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Koelreuteria paniculata
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Koelreuteria paniculata
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (1968): Koelreuteria paniculata 117-02-001


Half-inch yellow flowers borne in a 12-15" wide and loose panicle, per Manual of Woody Landscape Plants.


range map need picture of flower of Sapindus marginatus, Florida Soapberry
Common Name: Florida Soapberry
Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Sapindus marginatus
LESS THAN PLANTS National Database: Sapindus saponaria var. saponaria
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (1968): Sapindus marginatus 117-03-001
SYNONYMOUS WITH Manual of the Southeastern Flora (Small, 1933) Sapindus marginatus

range map need picture of flower of Sapindus saponaria var. drummondii, Western Soapberry
camera icon Common Name: Western Soapberry
Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Sapindus saponaria var. drummondii
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Sapindus saponaria var. drummondii
SYNONYMOUS WITH Sapindus drummondii

Your search found 4 taxa. You are on page PAGE 1 out of 1 pages.


"Few are altogether deaf to the preaching of pine trees. Their sermons on the mountains go to our hearts; and if people in general could be got into the woods, even for once, to hear the trees speak for themselves, all difficulties in the way of forest preservation would vanish." — John Muir