OF THE CAROLINAS & GEORGIA

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Most habitat and range descriptions were obtained from Weakley's Flora.

Your search found 2 taxa in the family Taxodiaceae, Bald Cypress family, as understood by Vascular Flora of the Carolinas.

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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Bald Cypress

Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Taxodium distichum   FAMILY: Cupressaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Taxodium distichum   FAMILY: Cupressaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Taxodium distichum 017-01-001   FAMILY: Taxodiaceae

 

Habitat: Brownwater and blackwater swamps, usually in riverine situations, depressions in bottomland forests, lake margins, river banks, rarely in wooded seeps

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Pond Cypress

Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Taxodium ascendens   FAMILY: Cupressaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Taxodium ascendens   FAMILY: Cupressaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Taxodium ascendens 017-01-002   FAMILY: Taxodiaceae

 

Habitat: Limesink ponds (dolines), clay-based Carolina bays, wet savannas, pocosins and other wet, peaty habitats, shores of natural blackwater lakes, swamps of blackwater streams, forming "domes" and "stringers" in Florida in very flat, fire landscapes, also as "hatrack" stands of widely spaced and stunted trees on oolite in south Florida

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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"...publicly owned land — our land. And we must pay the same attention to it that we do to our own property. We must attend hearings that concern it; we must write letters about it; and we must fight for it. If we don't, our natural communities will slip away from us as surely as ... the Carolina parakeet from the coastal plains." — Philip Manning, Palmetto Journal