Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia

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Your search found 3 taxa.

Most habitat and range descriptions were obtained from Weakley's Flora.

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camera icon Common Name: European Cornsalad
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Valerianella locusta
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Valerianella locusta
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Valerianella locusta 175-01-001

 

Look for it on roadsides, moist forests, bottomlands, disturbed areas

Common (rare in GA, rare in Coastal Plain)

Non-native: Europe

 


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camera icon Common Name: Beaked Cornsalad
Weakley's Flora: (2/8/20) Valerianella radiata
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Valerianella radiata
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Valerianella radiata 175-01-002

 

Look for it in moist forests, bottomlands, disturbed areas

Common

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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Common Name: Navel Cornsalad
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Valerianella umbilicata
(?) PLANTS National Database: Valerianella umbilicata
INCLUDED WITHIN Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Valerianella umbilicata 175-01-003

 

Look for it in moist forests, bottomlands, disturbed areas

Rare

Native to the Carolinas

 


Your search found 3 taxa. You are on page PAGE 1 out of 1 pages.


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