OF THE CAROLINAS & GEORGIA

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Most habitat and range descriptions were obtained from Weakley's Flora.

Your search found 3 taxa in the family Valerianaceae, Corn Salad family, as understood by Weakley's Flora.

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camera icon Common Name: European Cornsalad

Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Valerianella locusta   FAMILY: Valerianaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Valerianella locusta   FAMILY: Valerianaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Valerianella locusta 175-01-001   FAMILY: Valerianaceae

 

Look for it on roadsides, moist forests, bottomlands, disturbed areas

Common (rare in GA, rare in Coastal Plain)

Non-native: Europe

 


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camera icon Common Name: Beaked Cornsalad

Weakley's Flora: (2/8/20) Valerianella radiata   FAMILY: Valerianaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Valerianella radiata   FAMILY: Valerianaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Valerianella radiata 175-01-002   FAMILY: Valerianaceae

 

Look for it in moist forests, bottomlands, disturbed areas

Common

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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Common Name: Navel Cornsalad

Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Valerianella umbilicata   FAMILY: Valerianaceae

(?) PLANTS National Database: Valerianella umbilicata   FAMILY: Valerianaceae

INCLUDED WITHIN Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Valerianella umbilicata 175-01-003   FAMILY: Valerianaceae

 

Look for it in moist forests, bottomlands, disturbed areas

Rare

Native to the Carolinas

 


Your search found 3 taxa. You are on page PAGE 1 out of 1 pages.


"Modern botanical classification groups plants by sexual (reproductive) characteristics, but there are other ways to group plants. Native American tribes classify plants by directions of north, south, east, and west. The Cherokee further classify plants by their function — thus there are warrior plants such as brambles and poison ivy, and scout plants such as poplar and plantain." — Joyce A. Wardwell, The Herbal Home Remedy Book