Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia


2497

Shrub; Tree
Perennial

Non-native: Europe
Documented growing wild in - - -

map
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Invasive?

This plant may be causing problems in natural areas outside its native range, according to authorities such as:

Brooklyn Botanic Garden

LEAVES:
Deciduous
Simple
Alternate
Petioles 1/4-3/4 length of blade, eglandular

FLOWER:
Spring
White
Radially symmetrical
5-lobed calyx
5 petals
15-20 stamens (anthers pink or purplish)
Inferior ovary
Inflorescences of 3-20 flowers

FRUIT:
Summer/Fall
Red (flesh soft)
Pome

 

TO LEARN MORE about this plant, look it up in a good book!



Spermatophytes (seed plants): Angiosperms (flowering plants): Eudicots: Core Eudicots: Rosids: Fabids: Rosales
Series: Crataegus

WEAKLEY'S FLORA (5/21/15):
Crataegus monogyna   FAMILY Rosaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS NATIONAL DATABASE:
Crataegus monogyna   FAMILY Rosaceae

GREATER THAN Flora of North America
Crataegus monogyna var. monogyna

SYNONYMOUS WITH Haws: A Guide to Hawthorns of the Southeastern US (Lance, 2014)
Crataegus monogyna

 

COMMON NAME:
English Hawthorn, Singleseed Hawthorn


Click or hover over the thumbnails to see larger pictures.

image of Crataegus monogyna

Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org    bug_5386431

April-May?        

Flowers 10-15mm wide, flowering in April or May after leaves are half-grown, per Haws: A Guide to Hawthorns of the Southeastern US.

image of Crataegus monogyna

Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org    bug_5386432

September-October?        

Leaves ovate to deltate, often deeply lobed. Fruit red, 6-14mm wide, per Haws: A Guide to Hawthorns of the Southeastern US.

image of Crataegus monogyna

Tom DeGomez, University of Arizona, Bugwood.org    bug_5389900

Month Unknown        

Bark scaly, grayish, becoming furrowed on old trunks, per Haws: A Guide to Hawthorns of the Southeastern US.