Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia


3833

Tree
Perennial
Monoecious

Non-native: Malaysia, southern Asia, Oceania
Documented growing wild in - - -

Look for it on beaches, dunes, suburban areas, disturbed areas, per Weakley's Flora

map
To see a detailed map, click here


Invasive?

This plant may be causing problems in natural areas outside its native range, according to authorities such as:

Alabama Invasive Plant Council, 2012

 

LEAVES:
Evergreen
Simple - needle-like

FLOWER:
Spring/Summer/Fall
Red?
Unisexual

FRUIT:
Winter/Spring/Summer/Fall
Brown
A tiny, one-seeded, winged nutlet (samara), formed in woody cone-like clusters

 

TO LEARN MORE about this plant, look it up in a good book!



Spermatophytes (seed plants): Angiosperms (flowering plants): Eudicots: Core Eudicots: Rosids: Fabids: Fagales

WEAKLEY'S FLORA (11/30/12):
Casuarina equisetifolia ssp. equisetifolia   FAMILY Casuarinaceae

LESS THAN PLANTS NATIONAL DATABASE:
Casuarina equisetifolia   FAMILY Casuarinaceae

 

COMMON NAME:
Australian-pine, Horsetail Casuarina, Beach She-oak, Coastal She-oak


Click or hover over the thumbnails to see larger pictures.

picture of -, image of Casuarina equisetifolia ssp. equisetifolia

W.D. Brush / USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database    pnd_caeq_010_lvp

        

Male flowers are borne in slender cylindrical spikes at the twig tips, per www.wiki.bugwood.org.

picture of -, image of Casuarina equisetifolia ssp. equisetifolia

W.D. Brush / USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database    pnd_caeq_011_lvp

        

Female flowers occur in lateral heads on non-shedding branchlets, per www.wiki.bugwood.org.

picture of -, image of Casuarina equisetifolia ssp. equisetifolia

Dan Clark, USDI National Park Service, Bugwood.org    bug_5281019

Month Unknown        

Its very slender green twigs resemble pine needles, but it is not a pine, per Invasive Plants, Guide to Identification, Impacts and Control.

picture of -, image of Casuarina equisetifolia ssp. equisetifolia

Dan Clark, USDI National Park Service, Bugwood.org    bug_5281021

Month Unknown        

Peak bloom in April, a lesser one in September. Some fruit present any time, per Invasive Plants, Guide to Identification, Impacts and Control.

picture of -, image of Casuarina equisetifolia ssp. equisetifolia

Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org    bug_5285005

Month Unknown        HI

Reported for AL in 2012, "definitely naturalized and suckering", per Weakley's Flora.

picture of -, image of Casuarina equisetifolia ssp. equisetifolia

Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org    bug_5285045

Month Unknown        FL

Can grow 10' in a year, and in 5 years is producing thousands of seeds, per Invasive Plants, Guide to Identification, Impacts and Control.

picture of -, image of Casuarina equisetifolia ssp. equisetifolia

Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org    bug_5446281

Month Unknown        

Shallow-rooted and inhibiting the growth of native dune-stabilizing plants, per Invasive Plants, Guide to Identification, Impacts and Control.

picture of -, image of Casuarina equisetifolia ssp. equisetifolia

Christina Southwick, Dried Botanical ID, USDA APHIS ITP, Bugwood.org     bug_5463792

Month Unknown        

Half-inch fruits look like rounded cones and contain 70-90 light flat seeds, per Invasive Plants, Guide to Identification, Impacts and Control.