Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia

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Most habitat and range descriptions were obtained from Weakley's Flora.

Your search found 2 taxa in the family Blechnaceae, Deer Fern family, as understood by Vascular Flora of the Carolinas.

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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Virginia Chain-fern
Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Anchistea virginica   FAMILY: Blechnaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Woodwardia virginica   FAMILY: Blechnaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Woodwardia virginica 012-01-001   FAMILY: Blechnaceae

 

Look for it in moist to wet, acid, organic soils, such as bogs, blackwater bottomlands, pocosins, sometimes in standing water, as in periodically flooded coastal plain depression ponds

Common in Coastal Plain (rare elsewhere)

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Netted Chain-fern, Net-veined Chainfern
Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Lorinseria areolata   FAMILY: Blechnaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Woodwardia areolata   FAMILY: Blechnaceae
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Woodwardia areolata 012-01-002   FAMILY: Blechnaceae

 

Look for it in moist to wet, acid, organic soils, such as bogs, blackwater bottomands, pocosins

Common

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia

 


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"No matter how compelling the argument for learning the names of plants, however, the beginner should be aware that it is possible to spoil the fun by trying too hard." — Richard M. Smith, Wildflowers of the Southern Mountains