Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia

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Your search found 4 taxa.

Most habitat and range descriptions were obtained from Weakley's Flora.

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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Thorny Olive, Autumn Siverberry, Silverthorn, Thorny Elaeagnus
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Elaeagnus pungens
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Elaeagnus pungens
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Elaeagnus pungens 134-01-001

 

Look for it in forests and woodlands in suburban areas

Uncommon

Non-native: Japan

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Autumn Olive, Spring Silverberry
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Elaeagnus umbellata var. parvifolia
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Elaeagnus umbellata var. parvifolia
INCLUDED WITHIN Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Elaeagnus umbellata 134-01-002

 

Look for it in forests and woodlands

Common

Non-native: China/Japan

 


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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Russian Olive, Oleaster
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Elaeagnus angustifolia
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Elaeagnus angustifolia

 

Look for it in disturbed areas

Uncommon

Non-native: Eurasia

 


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speaker icon Common Name: Cherry Elaeagnus, Cherry Silverberry
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Elaeagnus multiflora
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Elaeagnus multiflora

 

Look for it in disturbed areas

Rare

Non-native: Japan & China

 


Your search found 4 taxa. You are on page PAGE 1 out of 1 pages.


"Gardeners have long recognized the importance of native plants in the home landscape for their wildlife value and their hardiness, and for their unique spot in the ecology of local environments." — Marian St. Clair, freelance garden writer