Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia


1412

Forb
Perennial

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia
Documented growing wild in GA NC SC

Common

Look for it in fields, roadsides, disturbed areas, per Weakley's Flora

map
To see a detailed map, click here

 

full sun partial shade ...Moist ...Variable ...Dry

LEAVES:
Simple
Alternate

FLOWER:
Summer/Fall
Rays: Yellow
Disc: Yellow
Disc flowers bisexual & fertile/ Ray flowers pistillate & fertile
Inferior ovary
Flower heads in well-developed paniculate inflorescences

FRUIT:
Summer/Fall
Achene

 

TO LEARN MORE about this plant, look it up in a good book!



Spermatophytes (seed plants): Angiosperms (flowering plants): Eudicots: Core Eudicots: Asterids: Campanulids: Asterales

WEAKLEY'S FLORA (11/30/12):
Solidago altissima var. altissima   FAMILY Asteraceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS NATIONAL DATABASE:
Solidago altissima   FAMILY Asteraceae

LESS THAN VASCULAR FLORA OF THE CAROLINAS (1968) 179-49-030:
Solidago altissima   FAMILY Asteraceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Britton & Brown Illus Flora of Northeast US & adjacent Canada (Gleason, 1952)
Solidago canadensis var. scabra

LESS THAN Guide to the Vascular Plants of the Blue Ridge (Wofford, 1989)
Solidago canadensis

 

COMMON NAME:
Tall Goldenrod, Field Goldenrod, Common Goldenrod


Click or hover over the thumbnails to see larger pictures.

image of Solidago altissima var. altissima

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913    pnd_soal6_001_lvd

        

image of Solidago altissima var. altissima

JK Marlow    jkm140831_133

August    Greenville County    SC

Swamp Rabbit Trail

S. altissima is the goldenrod that usually has mid-to-upper stem ball galls, per Asterae Lab: Classification and illustrations of goldenrods (J.C. Semple).

image of Solidago altissima var. altissima

JK Marlow    jkm140831_135

August    Greenville County    SC

Swamp Rabbit Trail

Short hairs can give fresh plants a gray-green tone not seen in S. canadensis, per Flora of North America.

image of Solidago altissima var. altissima

JK Marlow    jkm140909_567

September    Greenville County    SC

Swamp Rabbit Trail

image of Solidago altissima var. altissima

JK Marlow    jkm140909_571

September    Greenville County    SC

Swamp Rabbit Trail

image of Solidago altissima var. altissima

JK Marlow    jkm140909_573

September    Greenville County    SC

Swamp Rabbit Trail

image of Solidago altissima var. altissima

JK Marlow    jkm140909_574

September    Greenville County    SC

Swamp Rabbit Trail

Mid-stem leaves entire to serrulate, per Weakley's Flora.

image of Solidago altissima var. altissima

JK Marlow    jkm140909_578

September    Greenville County    SC

Swamp Rabbit Trail

Distinguished by short-hairy pubescence on stems & leaves, upper lvs entire, per Asterae Lab: Classification and illustrations of goldenrods (J.C. Semple).

image of Solidago altissima var. altissima

JK Marlow    jkm140909_579

September    Greenville County    SC

Swamp Rabbit Trail

Leaves moderately to densely pubescent across the lower surface, per Weakley's Flora.

image of Solidago altissima var. altissima

JK Marlow    jkm140909_580

September    Greenville County    SC

Swamp Rabbit Trail

image of Solidago altissima var. altissima

JK Marlow    jkm140917_802

September    Greenville County    SC

Swamp Rabbit Trail

Upper stem leaves entire, thicker than the serrate upper lvs of S canadensis, per Asterae Lab: Classification and illustrations of goldenrods (J.C. Semple).

image of Solidago altissima var. altissima

Tim Spira    tpssaltissima2

September        

Flowers in an erect, broad, pyramid-shaped panicle, per Forest Plants of the Southeast and Their Wildlife Uses.

image of Solidago altissima var. altissima

Gill Newberry    gn10_s_altissima

October        

This is the most common goldenrod of the Great Plains & e. North America, per Asterae Lab: Classification and illustrations of goldenrods (J.C. Semple).

image of Solidago altissima var. altissima

Patrick D. McMillan    pdmsattissima_0

Month Unknown        

Stems are 0.8-2m tall from a creeping rhizome, forming colonies, per Forest Plants of the Southeast and Their Wildlife Uses.