Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia


2850

Forb
Annual
Has white to yellowish latex (milky sap)

Non-native: Europe
Documented growing wild in - NC SC

Uncommon to rare in NC, SC

Look for it on roadsides, in fields, disturbed areas, per Weakley's Flora

map
To see a detailed map, click here

 

full sun ...Variable

LEAVES:
Simple: Pinnately parted or divided
Basal rosette & alternate
Basal & lower stem leaves have petioles; upper stem leaves are sessile.

FLOWER:
Spring/Summer
Light red
Peduncles long
Bisexual
Radially symmetrical, or nearly so
2-merous
2-3 sepals
4 petals
Numerous stamens
Superior ovary
Flowers solitary, terminal

FRUIT:
Spring/Summer
Capsule

 

TO LEARN MORE about this plant, look it up in a good book!



Spermatophytes (seed plants): Angiosperms (flowering plants): Eudicots: Ranunculales

WEAKLEY'S FLORA (5/21/15):
Papaver dubium   FAMILY Papaveraceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS NATIONAL DATABASE:
Papaver dubium   FAMILY Papaveraceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH VASCULAR FLORA OF THE CAROLINAS (1968) 085-05-004:
Papaver dubium   FAMILY Papaveraceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Manual of the Southeastern Flora (Small, 1933)
Papaver dubium

 

COMMON NAME:
Long-headed Poppy, Blind Eyes


Click or hover over the thumbnails to see larger pictures.

image of Papaver dubium

Flora of North America (www.efloras.org)    fna_papaver_dubium

        

image of Papaver dubium

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913    pnd_padu_001_lvd

        

image of Papaver dubium

Terry Holdsclaw    tdh_papaver_dubium_0004

May    Iredell County    NC

Flower: petals orange to red, rarely with dark basal spot; anthers violet, per Flora of North America.

image of Papaver dubium

Terry Holdsclaw    tdh_papaver_dubium_0005

May    Iredell County    NC

Capsule sessile or substipitate, narrowly obovoid, usually distinctly ribbed, per Flora of North America.

image of Papaver dubium

Terry Holdsclaw    tdh_papaver_dubium_0013

May    Iredell County    NC

The stigma is a 5-9 rayed, radially lobed disk on the summit of the ovary, per Wildflowers of the Southern Mountains.