Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia


3226

Forb
Winter annual/Biennial

Non-native: Europe
Documented growing wild in GA NC SC

Common (rare in Coastal Plain of GA & SC)

Look for it in fields, disturbed areas, per Weakley's Flora

map
To see a detailed map, click here

 

LEAVES:
Simple
Basal & alternate

FLOWER:
Spring/Summer
Deep yellow (mostly uniform in color)
Bisexual
Radially symmetrical
4 sepals
4 petals
6 stamens tetradynamous (2 short, 4 long)

FRUIT:
Silique

 

TO LEARN MORE about this plant, look it up in a good book!



Spermatophytes (seed plants): Angiosperms (flowering plants): Eudicots: Core Eudicots: Rosids: Malvids: Brassicales

WEAKLEY'S FLORA (11/30/12):
Brassica rapa var. rapa   FAMILY Brassicaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS NATIONAL DATABASE:
Brassica rapa var. rapa   FAMILY Brassicaceae

LESS THAN VASCULAR FLORA OF THE CAROLINAS (1968) 088-11-005?:
Brassica napus   FAMILY Brassicaceae

GREATER THAN Manual of the Southeastern Flora (Small, 1933)
Brassica campestris

GREATER THAN Britton & Brown Illus Flora of Northeast US & adjacent Canada (Gleason, 1952)
Brassica rapa

 

COMMON NAME:
Turnip, Field Mustard, Field Rape, Chinese Cabbage


Click or hover over the thumbnails to see larger pictures.

picture of Brassica napus, image of Brassica rapa var. rapa

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913    pnd_brca2_001_lvd

        

picture of Brassica napus, image of Brassica rapa var. rapa

JK Marlow    jkm0505i_30

May    Jackson County    NC

Blue Ridge Parkway

Field Mustard is the wild ancestor of the cultivated turnip, per Wildflowers of Tennessee, the Ohio Valley, and the Southern Appalachians.

picture of Brassica napus, image of Brassica rapa var. rapa

JK Marlow    jkm0505i_35

May    Jackson County    NC

Blue Ridge Parkway

Flowers overtopping or equaling buds when open, petals 6-11(-13)mm, per Flora of North America.

picture of Brassica napus, image of Brassica rapa var. rapa

JK Marlow    jkm0505i_36

May    Jackson County    NC

Blue Ridge Parkway

Upper leaves unlobed, toothed or entire, clasping the stem, per Wildflowers of Tennessee, the Ohio Valley, and the Southern Appalachians.