Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia


3420

Forb
Perennial

Native to the Carolinas

Documented growing wild in - NC SC

Uncommon to rare

Look for it in seeps, bogs, other low sphagnous ground, including brackish areas , per Weakley's Flora

map
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...Wet

LEAVES:
Simple
Plant acaulescent (without aerial stems)
Foliage glabrous or glabrate

FLOWER:
Spring
Blue-violet
Bilaterally symmetrical
Spurred and lateral petals bearded
5 sepals
5 petals
5 stamens

FRUIT:
Spring
Capsule

 

TO LEARN MORE about this plant, look it up in a good book!



Spermatophytes (seed plants): Angiosperms (flowering plants): Eudicots: Core Eudicots: Rosids: Fabids: Malpighiales

WEAKLEY'S FLORA (2/8/20):
Viola brittoniana   FAMILY Violaceae

INCLUDING PLANTS NATIONAL DATABASE:
Viola brittoniana var. brittoniana   FAMILY Violaceae

INCLUDING PLANTS National Database
Viola brittoniana var. pectinata

SYNONYMOUS WITH Violaceae of the Southeastern US (McKinney & Russell, 2002)
Viola pedatifida ssp. brittoniana

INCLUDING VASCULAR FLORA OF THE CAROLINAS (1968) 130-02-012a:
Viola brittoniana var. brittoniana   FAMILY Violaceae

INCLUDING Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968)
Viola brittoniana var. pectinata

INCLUDING Gray's Manual of Botany (Fernald, 1950)
Viola brittoniana

INCLUDING Gray's Manual of Botany (Fernald, 1950)
Viola pectinata

 

COMMON NAME:
Northern Coastal Violet, Coast Violet, Britton's Violet


Click or hover over the thumbnails to see larger pictures.

image of Viola brittoniana, Northern Coastal Violet, Coast Violet, Britton's Violet

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913    pnd_vipe9_001_lvd

        

[var. pectinata] has somewhat triangular leaves and large sharp basal teeth, per Vascular Plants of North Carolina.

image of Viola brittoniana, Northern Coastal Violet, Coast Violet, Britton's Violet

Bruce A. Sorrie    bas_viola_brittoniana1

June    Richmond County    NC

Leaves typically cleft into 7-11 linear segments, middle one often wider, per Vascular Plants of North Carolina.