OF THE CAROLINAS & GEORGIA

Spermatophytes (seed plants): Angiosperms (flowering plants): Eudicots: Core Eudicots: Rosids: Malvids: Sapindales

WEAKLEY'S FLORA (11/30/12):
Aesculus hippocastanum   FAMILY Sapindaceae


SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS NATIONAL DATABASE:
Aesculus hippocastanum   FAMILY Hippocastanaceae

 

COMMON NAME:
Horsechestnut


         To see larger pictures, click or hover over the thumbnails.

image of Aesculus hippocastanum, Horsechestnut

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / US Forest Service    pnd_aescu_002_lvp

        

image of Aesculus hippocastanum, Horsechestnut

Richard and Teresa Ware    rtw_a_hippocastanum_2

May    Suffolk County    MA

Arnold Arboretum

A tree 50-75' tall, usually a spread of 40-70'. Can grow to 100' or taller, per Manual of Woody Landscape Plants.

image of Aesculus hippocastanum, Horsechestnut

Richard and Teresa Ware    rtw_a_hippocastanum_9

May    Suffolk County    MA

Arnold Arboretum

image of Aesculus hippocastanum, Horsechestnut

Richard and Teresa Ware    rtw_a_hippocastanum_c

August        

Flowers white with a blotch of yellow at the base which turns reddish, per Manual of Woody Landscape Plants.

 

WEAKLEY'S FLORA (11/30/12):
Aesculus hippocastanum   FAMILY Sapindaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS NATIONAL DATABASE:
Aesculus hippocastanum   FAMILY Hippocastanaceae

 

Find by scientific name:

3580

Tree
Perennial

Non-native: southeast Europe

Documented growing wild in - NC SC

Rare in our area

Look for it in urban and suburban areas; perhaps not definitely naturalized, but fairly often planted and escaping as seedlings, per Weakley's Flora

map
Click here to see a more detailed map from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Herbarium,

or click here to see a map from SERNEC, a consortium of southeastern herbaria.

 

LEAVES:
Deciduous
Palmately compound: (5)7 leaflets
Opposite

FLOWER:
Spring
White with red spots & yellow claw
Bisexual
5-8 sepals
4-5 petals

Flowers in terminal panicles

FRUIT:
Summer/Fall
Brown
Capsule

 

TO LEARN MORE about this plant, look it up in a good book!



 


Find by scientific name: