Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia

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Your search found 3 taxa.

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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Indian Pipes, Ghost Flower
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Monotropa uniflora
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Monotropa uniflora
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (1968): Monotropa uniflora 145-03-001

Flowers solitary, nodding, urn-shaped, the same color as the stem, per Wildflowers of Tennessee, the Ohio Valley, and the Southern Appalachians.


camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Pinesap
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Hypopitys monotropa
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Monotropa hypopithys
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (1968): Monotropa hypopithys 145-03-002

Autumn flowering plants are mostly pink to red, ofen marked with yellow, per Vascular Flora of the Carolinas.


camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Appalachian Pygmy Pipes, Sweet Pinesap
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Monotropsis odorata
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Monotropsis odorata
GREATER THAN Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (1968): Monotropsis odorata + 145-04-001

Numerous fragrant purplish flowers barely extend past stem's brown scales, per Wildflowers of Tennessee, the Ohio Valley, and the Southern Appalachians.


Your search found 3 taxa. You are on page PAGE 1 out of 1 pages.


"...publicly owned land — our land. And we must pay the same attention to it that we do to our own property. We must attend hearings that concern it; we must write letters about it; and we must fight for it. If we don't, our natural communities will slip away from us as surely as ... the Carolina parakeet from the coastal plains." — Philip Manning, Palmetto Journal