Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia

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Your search found 9 taxa.

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map not available need picture of flower of Buddleja spp., Butterflybush
Common Name: Butterflybush
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Buddleja spp.
PLANTS National Database: Buddleja spp.
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (1968): Buddleja spp. 154-05-000

SYNONYMOUS WITH Buddleia spp.


camera icon Common Name: Lindley's Butterflybush
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Buddleja lindleyana
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Buddleja lindleyana
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (1968): Buddleja lindleyana 154-05-001

SYNONYMOUS WITH Buddleia lindleyana


Flowers purple without an orange center.Leaves dark green, upper side shiny, per Invasive Plants, Guide to Identification, Impacts and Control.


camera icon Common Name: Orange-eye Butterflybush, Summer-lilac
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Buddleja davidii
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Buddleja davidii
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (1968): Buddleja davidii 154-05-002

SYNONYMOUS WITH Buddleia davidii


Flowers white to pink to shades of purple, usually purple w orange centers, per Invasive Plants, Guide to Identification, Impacts and Control.


camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Moth Mullein
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Verbascum blattaria
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Verbascum blattaria
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (1968): Verbascum blattaria 166-12-001

Flowers yellow or white; the 5 fertile stamens w woolly purple filaments, per Wildflowers of Tennessee, the Ohio Valley, and the Southern Appalachians.


camera icon Common Name: Wand Mullein, Twiggy Mullein, Moth Mullein
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Verbascum virgatum
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Verbascum virgatum
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (1968): Verbascum virgatum 166-12-002

The fuzzy stamens resemble a moth's antennae, hence one common name, per Wildflowers of the Carolina Lowcountry.


camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Woolly Mullein, Common Mullein, Flannel-plant, Velvet-plant
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Verbascum thapsus ssp. thapsus
INCLUDED WITHIN PLANTS National Database: Verbascum thapsus

SYNONYMOUS WITH Flora of North America Verbascum thapsus ssp. thapsus

INCLUDED WITHIN Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (1968): Verbascum thapsus 166-12-003

Corolla yellow and 5-lobed, 15-25mm wide, within woolly 5-lobed sepals, per Forest Plants of the Southeast and Their Wildlife Uses.


range map need picture of flower of Verbascum phlomoides, Clasping Mullein, Orange Mullein
Common Name: Clasping Mullein, Orange Mullein
Weakley's Flora: (6/30/18) Verbascum phlomoides
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Verbascum phlomoides
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (1968): Verbascum phlomoides 166-12-004

camera icon Common Name: Eastern Figwort, Carpenter's Square, Late Figwort
Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Scrophularia marilandica
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Scrophularia marilandica
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (1968): Scrophularia marilandica 166-15-001

SYNONYMOUS WITH Manual of the Southeastern Flora (Small, 1933) Scrophularia marilandica


Flowers less than 3/8", reddish-brown and strongly bilabiate, per Wildflowers of the Southern Mountains.


camera icon Common Name: Hare Figwort, American Figwort, Lancelaf Figwort
Weakley's Flora: (5/21/15) Scrophularia lanceolata
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Scrophularia lanceolata

Corolla dull reddish-brown, lacking a spur, upper lip not forming a hood, per Wildflowers of the Eastern United States.


Your search found 9 taxa. You are on page PAGE 1 out of 1 pages.


"Throughout our history, we in North America have sought the unusual and exotic: Old World crystal, ...tropical birds, ...and the most ...flamboyant of foreign plants for our gardens. However there is a movement afoot to reassess our horticultural preferences. We are beginning to appreciate our native trees and other plants and to recognize some faults among the exotics...." — Jim Wilson & Guy Sternberg, Landscaping with Native Trees