Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia


2541

Shrub
Perennial
Usually dioecious

Native to the Carolinas & Georgia
Documented growing wild in GA NC SC

Common in Coastal Plain (rare in Pdmt), endemic to Southeastern Coastal Plain

Look for it pocosins. This is more restricted to wet, peaty sites than is Ilex glabra, per Weakley's Flora

map
To see a detailed map, click here

 

...Wet

LEAVES:
Evergreen
Simple
Alternate

FLOWER:
Spring
White/Greenish-white
Usually unisexual
5-7 merous
5-7 sepals
5-7 petals

FRUIT:
Summer/Fall
Black
Drupe

 

TO LEARN MORE about this plant, look it up in a good book!



Spermatophytes (seed plants): Angiosperms (flowering plants): Eudicots: Core Eudicots: Asterids: Campanulids: Aquifoliales

WEAKLEY'S FLORA (11/30/12):
Ilex coriacea   FAMILY Aquifoliaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS NATIONAL DATABASE:
Ilex coriacea   FAMILY Aquifoliaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH VASCULAR FLORA OF THE CAROLINAS (1968) 112-01-010:
Ilex coriacea   FAMILY Aquifoliaceae

 

COMMON NAME:
Sweet Gallberry, Big Gallberry, Large Gallberry


Click or hover over the thumbnails to see larger pictures.

image of Ilex coriacea

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913    pnd_ilco_001_lvd

        

image of Ilex coriacea

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / USDA Wetland flora: Field office illustrated guide    pnd_ilco_003_lvd

        

image of Ilex coriacea

Patrick D. McMillan    pdmicoriacea_junkyard1

April    Clarendon County    SC

Pistillate flowers have ovaries and sterile stamens.

image of Ilex coriacea

Keith Bradley    kab_ilex_coriacea_7119

May    Lexington County    SC

Shealey's Pond Heritage Preserve

Lvs 1.5-3x long as wide (~2-3cm wide), entire or few marginal spinose prickles, per Weakley's Flora.

image of Ilex coriacea

Patrick D. McMillan    pdmicoriacea_steed1

May    Berkeley County    SC

Francis Marion National Forest

Staminate flowers have fertile stamens and lack ovaries.

image of Ilex coriacea

Will Stuart    wil_10800585184

November    Chesterfield County    SC

Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge

Stems on new growth of I. coriacea tend to be reddish (vs. older twigs gray). — Will Stuart