Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia

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Your search found 3 taxa.

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camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Kidneyleaf Grass-of-Parnassus, Appalachian Grass-of-Parnassus, Brook Parnassia
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Parnassia asarifolia
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Parnassia asarifolia
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Parnassia asarifolia 094-06-001

Petals grayish-veined; the 5 stamens separated by shorter sterile stamens, per Wildflowers of Tennessee, the Ohio Valley, and the Southern Appalachians.


camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Carolina Grass-of-Parnassus, Savanna Parnassia, Eyebright
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Parnassia caroliniana
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Parnassia caroliniana
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Parnassia caroliniana 094-06-002

Midway between petal base & apex, (9)11-17 main parallel veins; ovary white, per Weakley's Flora.


camera icon speaker icon Common Name: Bigleaf Grass-of-Parnassus, Limeseep Parnassia
Weakley's Flora: (11/30/12) Parnassia grandifolia
SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS National Database: Parnassia grandifolia
SYNONYMOUS WITH Vascular Flora of the Carolinas (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968): Parnassia grandifolia 094-06-003

Midway between petal base and apex, 5-9 main parallel veins; ovary green, per Weakley's Flora.


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"My work is loving the world. Here the sunflowers, there the hummingbird — equal seekers of sweetness. Here the quickening yeast; there the blue plums. Here the clam deep in the speckled sand. Are my boots old? Is my coat torn? Am I no longer young, and still not half-perfect? Let me Keep my mind on what matters, which is my work which is mostly standing still and learning to be astonished." — Mary Oliver, from Messenger