Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia


224

Shrub; Tree
Perennial
Dioecious
Has milky sap (latex)

Non-native: east Asia
Documented growing wild in GA NC SC

Common

Look for it in urban lots, disturbed areas, roadsides, per Weakley's Flora

map
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INVASIVE

This plant is causing problems in natural areas outside its native range, according to authorities such as:

Alabama Invasive Plant Council, 2012
Brooklyn Botanic Garden
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2006
Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2013
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council
SC Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2014
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2009
US Forest Service Southern Research Station

 

LEAVES:
Deciduous
Simple
Alternate, opposite, or whorled

FLOWER:
Spring
Yellowish-green
Unisexual
Radially symmetrical
4 sepals
Petals absent
4 stamens in staminate flowers
Superior ovary

FRUIT:
Summer/Fall
Reddish
Multiple of drupes

 

TO LEARN MORE about this plant, look it up in a good book!



Spermatophytes (seed plants): Angiosperms (flowering plants): Eudicots: Core Eudicots: Rosids: Fabids: Rosales

WEAKLEY'S FLORA (11/30/12):
Broussonetia papyrifera   FAMILY Moraceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS NATIONAL DATABASE:
Broussonetia papyrifera   FAMILY Moraceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH VASCULAR FLORA OF THE CAROLINAS (1968) 057-01-001:
Broussonetia papyrifera   FAMILY Moraceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH Manual of the Southeastern Flora (Small, 1933)
Papyrius papyriferus

 

COMMON NAME:
Paper Mulberry


Click or hover over the thumbnails to see larger pictures.

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database / Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913    pnd_papa32_001_lvd

        

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

JK Marlow    s050316_j

March    Rutherford County    NC

Leaf scars opposite; terminal bud lacking; buds visible, scaled; twigs hairy

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

Gill Newberry    gn04_b_papyrifera_flowers

April        

Male flowers in catkins similar to those of Morus, per Trees of the Southeastern United States.

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

JK Marlow    jkm080505_009

May    Spartanburg County    SC

Chinquapin Greenway

Most of the plants in the Southeast are male, with only staminate flowers, per Woody Plants of the Southeastern US: A Winter Guide.

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

JK Marlow    jkm0406m_14

June    Greenville County    SC

Bunched Arrowhead Heritage Preserve

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

JK Marlow    s040603_ad

June    Mecklenburg County    NC

Parking lot

Upper leaf surfaces are scabrous; lower surfaces velvety pubescent, per Native Trees of the Southeast, An Identification Guide.

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

JK Marlow    s040603_bc

June    Mecklenburg County    NC

Parking lot

Leaves are lobed or unlobed, with lobed leaves more common on sprouts, per Native Trees of the Southeast, An Identification Guide.


click here to see other plants that look similar to this COMPARE leaves of Mulberry species

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

Richard and Teresa Ware    rtw_b_papyrifera_2

August        

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

Gill Newberry    gn09_b_branch_tip

September        

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

Gill Newberry    gn09_b_papyrifera

September        

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

Gill Newberry    gn09_b_papyrifera_bark

September        

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

Gill Newberry    gn09_b_papyrifera_leaf

September        

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

Gill Newberry    gn09_b_papyrifera_stem

September        

Twigs of the current year densely hairy, per Trees of the Southeastern United States.

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

JK Marlow    jkm0410m_14

October    Greenville County    SC

Bunched Arrowhead Heritage Preserve

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

JK Marlow    jkm121006_268

October    Washington County    VA

Virginia Creeper Trail

Leaves have three prominent veins at the base, per Trees of the Southeastern United States.

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

JK Marlow    jkm121006_269

October    Washington County    VA

Virginia Creeper Trail

Twigs & petioles have long, spreading, glassily transparent hairs, per Native Trees of the Southeast, An Identification Guide.

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

Richard and Teresa Ware    rtw_b_papyrifera_1

December    Floyd County    GA

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org    bug_1539110

Month Unknown        

Most of the plants in the Southeast male, producing only staminate flowers, per Woody Plants of the Southeastern US: A Winter Guide.

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org    bug_1539112

Month Unknown        

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org    bug_2308106

Month Unknown        

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

Amy Richard, University of Florida, Bugwood.org    bug_5349036

Month Unknown        

Fruit rare in Southeast, globular, compound, orange turning reddish-purple, per A Field Guide for the Identification of Invasive Plants in Southern Forests.

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org    bug_5421958

Month Unknown        

image of Broussonetia papyrifera

Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org    bug_5476536

Month Unknown