Native & Naturalized Plants of the Carolinas & Georgia


43

Tree
Perennial
Polygamous

Non-native: east Asia
Documented growing wild in GA NC SC

Common (uncommon in Coastal Plain)

Look for it on roadsides, in forests, disturbed areas, including cities, esp in moist, fertile soils. In our area, this tree is now an aggressive and noxious weed, colonizing even undisturbed forests and outcompeting the native vegetation, per Weakley's Flora

map
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INVASIVE

This plant is causing problems in natural areas outside its native range, according to authorities such as:

Alabama Invasive Plant Council, 2012
Brooklyn Botanic Garden
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2006
Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2013
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council
NC Botanical Garden
NC Department of Transportation
SC Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2014
SC Native Plant Society
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2009
US Fish & Wildlife Service
US Forest Service Southern Research Station
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2014

 

LEAVES:
Deciduous
Odd-pinnately compound: 15-27 leaflets
Alternate

FLOWER:
Spring/Summer
Yellowish-green
Bisexual & unisexual
Radially symmetrical
5 sepals
5 petals
10 stamens in staminate flowers/2-3 stamens in perfect/absent in pistillate

FRUIT:
Summer/Fall
Pink
Schizocarp of samaroid mericarps

 

TO LEARN MORE about this plant, look it up in a good book!



Spermatophytes (seed plants): Angiosperms (flowering plants): Eudicots: Core Eudicots: Rosids: Malvids: Sapindales

WEAKLEY'S FLORA (11/30/12):
Ailanthus altissima   FAMILY Simaroubaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS NATIONAL DATABASE:
Ailanthus altissima   FAMILY Simaroubaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH VASCULAR FLORA OF THE CAROLINAS (1968) 104-01-001:
Ailanthus altissima   FAMILY Simaroubaceae

 

COMMON NAME:
Ailanthus, Tree-of-heaven