OF THE CAROLINAS & GEORGIA

Spermatophytes (seed plants): Angiosperms (flowering plants): Eudicots: Core Eudicots: Rosids: Fabids: Malpighiales

WEAKLEY'S FLORA (11/30/12):
Salix babylonica   FAMILY Salicaceae


SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS NATIONAL DATABASE:
Salix babylonica   FAMILY Salicaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH VASCULAR FLORA OF THE CAROLINAS (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968) 051-01-002:
Salix babylonica   FAMILY Salicaceae

 

COMMON NAME:
Weeping Willow


         To see larger pictures, click or hover over the thumbnails.

image of Salix babylonica, Weeping Willow

JK Marlow    jkm070715_021

July    Washington County    TN

Creekside/Riverside

Many trees identified as S. babylonica may actually be a cultivated hybrid, per Weakley's Flora (2012).

image of Salix babylonica, Weeping Willow

JK Marlow    jkm070715_025

July    Washington County    TN

Creekside/Riverside

Bark grayish or dark, with rough plates or scaly ridges, per Woody Plants of the Southeastern US: A Winter Guide.

image of Salix babylonica, Weeping Willow

The Dow Gardens Archive, Dow Gardens, Bugwood.org    bug_5143069

Month Unknown        

Perhaps the best known of the cultivated willows, per Trees of the Southeastern United States.

image of Salix babylonica, Weeping Willow

Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org    bug_5387635

Month Unknown        

Catkins 18-35mm long, appearing with the leaves, per Trees of the Southeastern United States.

image of Salix babylonica, Weeping Willow

Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org    bug_5387637

Month Unknown        

Leaves very narrowly lanceolate, glaucous and glabrate beneath, per Weakley's Flora.

 

WEAKLEY'S FLORA (11/30/12):
Salix babylonica   FAMILY Salicaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH PLANTS NATIONAL DATABASE:
Salix babylonica   FAMILY Salicaceae

SYNONYMOUS WITH VASCULAR FLORA OF THE CAROLINAS (Radford, Ahles, & Bell, 1968) 051-01-002:
Salix babylonica   FAMILY Salicaceae

 

Search by scientific name:

1297

Tree
Perennial
Dioecious

Non-native: Asia

Documented growing wild in GA NC SC

Uncommon

Look for it in disturbed areas, per Weakley's Flora

map
Click here to see a more detailed map from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Herbarium,

or click here to see a map from SERNEC, a consortium of southeastern herbaria.


Invasive?

This plant may be causing problems in natural areas outside its native range, according to authorities such as:

 

 

LEAVES:
Deciduous
Simple
Alternate

FLOWER:
Spring
Unisexual
Sepals absent
Petals absent
2-5 stamens
Superior ovary

Flowers in catkins, inflorescence usually erect

FRUIT:
Spring
Capsule

 

TO LEARN MORE about this plant, look it up in a good book!



 


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